The Glassware Guide

Whether you own a restaurant or you’re a frequent diner, it is widely known that beverage sales contribute largely to a restaurant’s overall profit. Deciding what glassware to stock at your facility is an important factor to take into consideration. At Mission we have a large variety of Restaurant Glassware to choose from all at our best possible price. It’s also important to consider a line of glassware that will be easy to replace and build on as you grow. 99% of people who handle glassware have broken a piece of glass at some point along the way-it’s an inevitable reality. In a restaurant environment, especially during rush hour, the chances of chipping or breaking a glass go up even more.  This “Glassware Guide” is an attempt to better familiarize our customers with the basic tips and good practices so that you can invest in glassware that will last. The two most common reasons that glasses break at the frequency they do  are as follows: THERMAL SHOCK: Thermal Shock occurs when a glass at a certain temperature comes in contact with another temperature extreme. For instance, a glass straight out of the dish machine shouldn’t be used right away for ice water. The glass needs to cool down to room temperature  before it’s safe to use. This works the same way when the variables are inverted: a cold glass shouldn’t be exposed to high heat temperatures until it has reached room temperature. It’s the drastic temperature changes that cause stress on the glass and consequently make it more susceptible to breakage. MECHANICAL SHOCK: Mechanical shock occurs when a glass comes in direct contact with another glass or clashes with something else {platter, spoon, sink, etc.}. These small, forceful impacts create invisible abrasions or weaknesses in the glass which make it highly susceptible to breakage over time. Mechanical Shock is perhaps the most common-yet most easily preventable way- to break your glassware. Tips To Remember:
  • Depending on the number of people you have dining make sure to have an adequate supply of glassware on hand so that your glasses coming from the dishwasher can get to proper temperature before going into service
  • When cleaning or polishing wine glasses don’t rotate the bowl and the base in the opposite direction as this can cause the stem to break off
  • Some people think adding vinegar to the dish machine’s final rinse helps result in streak-free glasses
  • Pick up glasses one by one, not in clusters, because friction occurs when grouped together
  • Never use glassware in the place of an ice scooper. If your glass breaks while in the ice supply it’s not only difficult to see it & extract it, but it could end up in your customer’s drink
  • When bussing tables, use caution and don’t stack glasses. Rather, put into racks or trays for optimal transportation
  • Never store flatware in glasses
  • Never stack glass on glass when storing as it can get stuck and easily crack when stored this way.
  • Throw away any chipped or cracked glassware. NEVER serve to your customer when there is a flaw in the glass. To view our full selection of glassware click here. Most of these tips are common knowledge but our hope is that it has refreshed your memory on good glassware practices. Have any questions? Email us at order@missionrs.com or call us at 1-800-319-0690

Caring For ProTEAK

We are crazy about Proteak’s impeccable wood cutting boards and butcher blocks here at Mission Restaurant Supply. This company not only focuses on Renewable Forestry, but their products perform beautifully in both commercial and residential kitchen settings. Like any wood product, Proteak requires the proper care. Here are a few tips for sustaining your Proteak products:     Seasoning: Seasoning your new Proteak cutting board or butcher block is a vital step to take before its debut. Teaked wood has a highly porous surface so it’s important to season the surface plenty and often to avoid cracking. {Try seasoning every other week.} The kind of oil you use to season the surface is equally as important. Proteak recommends using USP-grade mineral oil (no vegetable or cooking oil.) With the oil slightly warmed, apply it to the wood with a soft cloth, remembering to follow the grain direction. Normally the preliminary seasoning takes 4-5 coats letting each coat dry before applying the next. The oils below are also good options for seasoning your product:                 Coconut Oil                 Walnut Oil                 Almond Oil                 Beeswax Cleaning: Given the porous surface of wood you shouldn’t ever soak your Proteak in a sink of soapy water. Also, avoid using extreme detergents that can penetrate and dry out the wood. Some options for cleaning? You can scrub the board with hot water and mild soap, making sure to thoroughly dry after cleaning, or you can use white vinegar, a mild chlorine bleach, or hydrogen peroxide. For further information on Proteak, visit their website.

View our selection of Proteak products here!

Caring for Non-Stick Cookware

When it comes to buying new products for your commercial or residential kitchen, there is one “go-to” that makes the cut every time: Non-Stick Cookware. Non-stick cookware is a revolutionary addition to the foodservice industry and has transformed the way we cook. Though these items are generally more expensive than your normal cookware products, they are regarded as favorites because they make cooking a breeze, less oil is needed in the process, and clean-up is a carefree task. However, with every piece of non-stick cookware you purchase there are a few important things that need to be remembered. No Metal Utensils One of the biggest things to remember when cooking with your non-stick pans is to avoid using metal utensils. Why? This is because metal can easily nick the coating and scratch up the surface, damaging your pan and causing flaking and rusting over time. Pieces that flake off can contaminate your food and be detrimental to your health if consumed. So remember not to use metal utensils with your non-stick products; opt for silicone, rubber, plastic, or wooden utensils instead! Be Careful When Cleaning Never stick a searing hot, non-stick product directly into a sink of lukewarm water. You run the risk of warping the coating, which in turn hinders proper heat distribution. Let your pan cool completely before washing and it will last much longer. It is also best to wash and dry your non-stick cookware by hand instead of in a dishwasher. The strong chemical detergents that make up a dishwasher’s cycle are too harsh and can damage the coating that makes these products so desirable. Try using warm water, mild soap, a soft sponge and a cloth to properly clean and care for these items. Avoid Extreme Temperatures Interestingly, most non-stick cookware is not compatible with high heat temperatures (400 degrees or higher). It is crafted to work optimally with a low to medium heat. If you want to prolong the lifespan of your non-stick cookware, make sure not to blast the pan with intense heat. If you want cooking at home or in your commercial kitchen to be more enjoyable remember to invest in quality products and to take care of them accordingly. If you have any further questions on how to care for your non-stick products or any other kitchen items, email us for more information!

How to properly care for cast iron cookware!

It’s an age old question that is constantly being asked: How do I care for my Cast Iron Cookware? If you own cast iron cookware it’s important to follow a few simple steps before you start using it to prepare your favorite meals. By properly caring for your cast iron cookware you’ll be able to pass it down the family tree for generations to come.

GETTING STARTED: The very first thing you want to do is rinse your pan with hot water and dry it completely. Apply a thin layer of vegetable oil to the cooking surface of your pan and let it slowly pre-heat. You’ll be ready for cooking once the pan is pre-heated. Always remember to avoid cooking cold food in your pan.

CLEANING:  When you’re done cooking in your pan you should use a stiff brush and hot water for cleaning. Using dish soap and other abrasive detergents should be avoided. Also remember it’s never good to put a hot pan in cold water because thermal shock can lead to cracking and warping. Towel dry your cast iron pan completely and apply another thin coat of oil to the cooking surface.  Never let your cast iron air dry and never put it in the dishwasher! If rust should happen to form on your cast iron pan simply scour it off with steel wool and re-season (see below). Always store your cast iron cookware in a cool, dry place or in an oven (remember to take it out before using the oven!).

RE-SEASONING:  At some point food will start sticking to your pan or the color of your cast iron cookware will become dull. It’s time to re-season! Rinse your cast iron with hot water and a mild soap. Make sure you dry your cast iron completely. Apply a thin coat of vegetable oil on the inside and outside of your pan. Place a sheet of aluminum foil on the bottom rack of your oven to avoid dripping and place the pan upside down on the top rack. Set your oven to 350-400 degrees Fahrenheit. Bake your cast iron cookware for at least one hour then turn off your oven and let your cast iron cool off in the oven. Make sure your cast iron is stored in a cool, dry place.

By following these simple steps you should be able to enjoy using your cast iron cookware forever!