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  • Concession Food Trivia


    Image from www.hot-dog.org Image from www.hot-dog.org
    Whether it is nachos or hot dogs at a ball game, cotton candy at the rodeo or carnival, popcorn at the movies, or snow cones at summer festivals, classic concession food never goes out of style! Read on for a few historical tidbits that may surprise you about these trusty staples.


    • NACHOS: Any ideas how these gooey, decadent snacks came about? Or what the significance is behind the name? In 1988, a lady named Adriana P. Orr, a researcher with the Oxford English Dictionary, set out to discover the meaning behind the "nacho." What she found took her all the way back to Piedras Negras, Mexico, in 1943, when a group of army wives first ate nachos at a restaurant called the Viceroy Club. The chef was not at the restaurant, and so the maitre d', Ignacio "Nacho" Anaya, threw together the ingredients that he could muster from the kitchen (cheese, tortilla chips, and jalapenos.) Anaya later called the dish "Nachos Especiales" and the rest is history. Read this article for the full story.

    • COTTON CANDY: This sugary treat carries with it a surprisingly lengthy history! Spun sugar dates back all the way to Italy in the 1400s, when upper class families would enjoy it for dessert. It continued to be made and served throughout Europe over the centuries. Then, in the late 1800s, a European duo by the name of William Morrison and John Wharton created a "Fairy Floss" machine that would take sugar and melt it before turning it into strands. They would then mold the strands to a paper cone for convenient serving. They patented this machine and took boxes of their fairy floss to the St. Louis World Fair in 1904, where the crowds went wild over it. The product wouldn't be coined "Cotton Candy" until the 1920s.

    • HOT DOGS: Historians have long disagreed over the precise moment that hot dogs crossed into American culture, how they came to be served with bread, how they got their name, and how they became the standard at ball parks. Over the years, the stories seemed to tangle. The Germans have been said to be eating frankfurter (or sausage) since the late 1400s! Other stories reference "dachshund" sausages (smaller versions) coming to America through German immigrants in the 1800s. Legend has it that the name "hot dog" came from a cartoonist at the New York Polo grounds who was working a cart selling "red hot dachshund dogs," though he was unable to spell dachshund and printed "hot dogs" instead.

      www.smithsonianmag.com www.smithsonianmag.com
    • POPCORN: America's affinity for salted, buttery popcorn is undeniable and is best seen at your neighborhood movie theater. However, contrary to popular belief, movies and popcorn didn't always go hand in hand. Since the 1840s, popcorn was ubiquitous to American life and entertainment, with the exception of movie theaters. Why, you ask? Most operators didn't want to deal with the trash and mess that popcorn can make or the sounds of people crunching and snacking (in the days of silent film.) Then, around the time of the Great Depression, theater operators saw the treat as a way to boost revenue and sustain their businesses. Needless to say, popcorn and movies would never be apart again.

    • SNOW CONES: On sweltering summer days, there is nothing quite like an icy snow cone to satisfy the soul. These treats debuted at the 1919 State Fair of Texas when Dallas resident Samuel Bert sold them for the first time. That next year, he patented his ice crushing machine. During the Industrial Revolution, wagons would carry blocks of ice from New York to the Southern United States. When they passed through Baltimore, they handed out ice shavings to kids whose families would then flavor them. These "snowballs" as they are called continue to be a tradition in Baltimore today. (FYI: Snow cones have crushed ice and Snowballs have finely shaved ice and oftentimes more syrup!) But perhaps the most well known of all these snowball/snow cone influences is a man named Ernest Hansen of New Orleans. Hansen created the first electric ice-shaving machine called the Hansen Sno-Bliz, and his wife, Mary created all of the syrups to go with it. Their shop first opened in the 1930s and the snowballs are still a massive hit today in the Big Easy! In 2014, the Hansen's were the recipient of an America's Classics award via the James Beard Foundation.
  • Chef Diego Fernandez of Starfish, San Antonio

    Starfish on South Alamo Street, San Antonio Starfish on South Alamo Street, San Antonio

    It's not every day that a father and son have restaurants located on the same street, just a few doors from one another, but such is the case for Rene and Diego Fernandez. The father-son duo are marking the King William neighborhood with new foods and flavors to inspire the ever-changing San Antonio dining set, first with Azuca, and now with the seafood-focused Starfish. The dining experience at Starfish is accented by the beautiful historic building which is filled with wonderful seaside delights, from vibrant paintings to gorgeous glass jellyfish, which dangle from the ceiling. We had the pleasure of talking with Chef Diego who filled us in on his much-buzzed about restaurant, which opened in June 2014. Read on to learn a little more about the Chef's beginnings, inspirations, favorite culinary destinations, and his advice for prospective cooks and restaurateurs! Thank you Chef Diego for sharing!


    From left: Diego Fernandez, wife Maria del Carmen Fernandez and Evan Martinez From left: Diego Fernandez, wife Maria del Carmen Fernandez and Evan Martinez

    When did you first realize you wanted to be a professional chef?
    The first time that I realized that I wanted to be a professional Chef was probably my first day in a professional kitchen. I began working at Azuca as a prep cook at the age of 16.

    Tell us about your career path- where did you start off, what were you doing before? Soon after I started working at Azuca I enrolled at the CIA (Culinary Institute of America) in San Antonio. I would say the journey started there. During the nine month training at the CIA I was part of  the opening Team as a line cook at the Grand Hyatt. I would wake up early to go to school and get to work right after I got out. After graduating I transferred to Hyde Park , NY and finished my studies there. During a seven month externship at a prestigious boutique restaurant in Cape May, NJ I honed some of the skills and work ethic I carry on today. Under the tutelage of Chef Lucas Manteca i understood more than ever who I wanted to become. Soon after that I traveled to Orlando, FL and worked for three years at the Ritz-Carlton. Much of who I am today is due to the military style brigade they ran at this particular property.

    The interior of Starfish with its historic brick walls, glass jellyfish lights, vibrant art and fish sculpture. The interior of Starfish with its historic brick walls, glass jellyfish lights, vibrant art and fish sculpture.

    It's special that your family has been so incorporated in this line of work, especially with your dad just a few doors down from you at Azuca! What is that like and what can you say about your family-foodservice connection?
    We are beyond blessed to be right next to each other. My father has been the role model, mentor, friend, and now best business partner I could ever imagine. Our relationship at work is just that. I think we both subconsciously leave our titles at the door once we step out through the restaurant doors.  It's a wonderful balance we have. My wife is soon to give birth and so she is no longer cooking at Starfish. During the first few months she would be in charge of all the baking and pastry. Now those roles have been distributed throughout our team. Being a Peruvian national provides me with yet another perspective of the food and beverage world.  All in all the we are there for each other emotionally and professionally.

    Tell us a little bit about Starfish: the title, the concept, and what drew you to creating a seafood-focused menu? Has your love for seafood always been important?
    An actual starfish is able to regenerate a limb if throughout its life it happened to lose one. I believe our menu concept and ideology  is somewhat resemblant. As we continue to grow and change we keep in mind that in order to succeed you may have to lose a limb or two. We have changed our menu about four times in the time that we have been open. We do this to challenge ourselves and continue to evolve as cooks.  I think our love for food in general is a common thread that connects us as a team. Seafood to me is personal. It's an intimate relationship that I grew up with. For most of my childhood there was a body of water within walking distance. Deep down I am biased towards marine life.

    The whole aesthetic at Starfish from the furnishings to the integrity of the building, to the food is really something. What were you trying to achieve?
    Honestly we did not have to do much to the building itself. For one, the building is part of the historic society so you can't do much changing structurally. Secondly, the shape the building was in gave Starfish its persona. As far as the artwork, we connected with several talented artists in San Antonio to give the place its justification, from reclaimed wood acrylic paintings to jellyfish lights hanging below the bar. For me there is a fine line between classy sealife motifs and going “overboard” with fish nets and life savers. We certainly wanted to give the place a sophisticated look yet relaxed ambiance.

    Father / Son Duo: Chef Rene Fernandez and Chef Diego Fernandez Father / Son Duo: Chef Rene Fernandez and Chef Diego Fernandez

    What is your earliest and/or most treasured food memory?
    The first memory that captivated me took place in Puerto Rico. I was probably five years old. My mother took my brother and I to visit my father at the Dorado Hyatt. That day fisherman had caught what was probably an eight to nine foot marlin. We walked into the hotel's back entrance and met my dad in the butcher room. As we were entering he was making the initial cut. The rest is history.

    Could you share some advice for aspiring chefs, students and hopeful restaurateurs?
    To me as a student the most important part was to ask questions. In an age where everything can be found on the internet perhaps current students do not ask as much. Have a notepad with a pen or pencil on you at all times.  If you think for a second about asking a question that you think you should know, whether it concerns a technique, method, history, etc. I can guarantee there are about five more students that are wondering the same thing. When you're working as a paid employee or a commis or stage, be humble, respectful, and quiet. At home, stay in tune with your career choice. Read, explore, and experiment to give yourself the best possible choice to succeed.

    What experiences do you think have shaped you most as a chef?
    There are many to name. But as a whole I could remember one common thread between all of them. The building of a team that has one goal in mind. There is power in that. And after your first couple kitchen experiences you thirst for that feeling. Lastly I would say that I gave myself at least one year at any job before moving on. It's important that as a professional you never burn bridges.

    Where do you see the San Antonio food scene heading and how do you think it stands out in relation to Austin, Corpus, Dallas and Houston?
    Its hard to say about the surrounding major cities because I haven’t visited them in a while. But as for San Antonio, I am very proud to be back in this city. Not only are we NBA champions but the food scene here is progressing every day. I see the food scene being par with any major metropolitan city in the next five years. With outstanding restaurateurs like Andrew Wiseman, Johnny Hernandez, Jason Daddy, Mark Bliss, among many others we have the recipe for a success story.

    One of the bold fish paintings that hangs on the establishment's walls. One of the bold fish paintings that hangs on the establishment's walls.

    What are some of your most prized tools in the back of the house?
    The Vita-Mix is probably one of the more important pieces of equipment that we have. Pots and pans are also important to us. We take good care of these knowing that they will provide our guest with an exceptional end product.

    The Mission Team is very excited to have you all in the neighborhood. Tell us a little bit about the building, being in San Antonio, and what your Southtown/ King William location adds to the experience.
    The building has taken many roles throughout its existence. Originally this location was a hub for paint and sheet rock. The name was Menny’s Paint Shop. For a time it served as a small market which I had the pleasure of visiting many times. Currently, I believe Starfish adds some nostalgia for people who may have lived in other major cities like Chicago, New York, or San Francisco. I’ve had several guests tell me that Starfish reminds them of a previous spot they would go to in one of these cities.

    Which tastemakers, mixologists & foodservice professionals inspire you?
    Heston Blumenthal, Morimmoto, Thomas Keller, Eric Ripert, Alain Ducasse, Wyle DuFrense, Ferran Adria, Joan Roca, Voltaggio Brothers, just to name a few.

    Can you share with us your favorite culinary destinations?
    There is no other city like New York City to dine in. Probably one of my favorite places. Also Lima, Peru changed my life. The freshness, variety, and application of chefs there is unbelievable. Mexico City is another mecca for humble food origins with an aftermath that makes you want to return.

    A delicious tuna dish accented with flowers. A delicious tuna dish accented with flowers.

    Which places are you’re dying to go and explore for yourself? Any particular dining destinations on your list?
    I really want to go to Spain and Italy. I think I'm half Italian and half Spanish deep down. Mugaritz is one of the restaurants i would love to dine at. Also Noma in Copenhagen.

    Do you have a personal creed or ethos that you live by?
    “Anything in life worth doing is worth overdoing. Moderation is for cowards.” -unknown-

    Lay out a perfect meal and wine/cocktail pairing for a first timer to Starfish.
    For any first time diners, let me know and we will make a perfect custom meal for you!

    What has been the biggest surprise in your life?
    My wife surprising me with the news of our first baby.

    Any fun quirks you can share about yourself?
    In the mornings when I wake up my hand are raised in the air. Not sure why that happens.

    Lastly, what’s up next for the Starfish team?
    James Beard.

    Starfish is located at 709 S. Alamo Street San Antonio, Texas 78205
    www.starfishsa.com 210-375-4423
    Images courtesy of 10 Best, San Antonio Express News & Starfishsa.com 
  • Chef Interview | Jesse Perez | Arcade Midtown Kitchen

    Tucked into the bustling Pearl Brewery in San Antonio is a place called Arcade Midtown Kitchen where "Food Fortune Awaits." The aesthetics of the place are as satisfying outside as they are inside, and best yet, the food (and drinks) don't disappoint. The man behind it is Jesse Perez, a local chef who has earned his stripes working in his native San Antonio in addition to both the East and West coasts, and also in Mexico. The fusion of those culinary styles, flavors and traditions come together to make "something old, something mood, something borrowed and damn good food." Somewhere between the crispy chili and lime calamari to the soft lobster taco with sweet potato and the delectable brussel sprouts, we became caught in a paradise of flavors and relaxed fare. Wash down your meal with one of Arcade's signature craft cocktails and make sure to stop by the bathroom for a fortune telling visit to Zoltar. Without further ado, check out our latest Chef Interview with Jesse Perez from Arcade Midtown Kitchen.
    Jesse-Perez-Large

    MRS: When did you first realize you wanted to be a professional chef?
    CHEF JP: I grew up being comfortable in the kitchen. At home my grandmother and my mother did all the cooking. The kitchen was where all the action was and so was the food. It wasn’t until my first cooking job while at the University of Michigan that I realized that the kitchen wasn’t scary to me and felt right at home.

    MRS: Did cooking play a large role in your upbringing and childhood? If so, how did it shape you?
    CHEF JP: All the meals growing up where made at home. Something was always cooking at home, breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Whether it was my grandmother or mother or my father. Going out to eat was a very rare occasion. It was always about the home cooked meal. Nothing better than that.

    MRS: What is your earliest and/or most treasured food memory?
    CHEF JP: I believe the most treasured memories that I have with food are the monthly barbecue cook-outs that my Dad and my uncle would have as fundraisers for birthdays or for friends/family in need. All the family would get together and pitch in their ‘best of’ for the offering. It was truly inspiring.

    MRS: What advice do you have for aspiring chefs, students and hopeful restaurateurs?
    CHEF JP: My advice is to be a student of the craft. Earn your stripes and battle scars by staging at a few restaurants and search for chefs and kitchens that will hone your skills. Then make the decision if this is truly a career path you want to pursue, or realize that you just like to cook. A real restaurant is not what you see on TV.

    MRS: Your career path has taken you from coast to coast. What did you like most and notice most about east/west styles?
    CHEF JP: Working as an Executive Chef in Atlanta was an amazing experience. The southern approach to food was a great lesson for me. Serious but simple was the approach and making great food was the only way to make a mark on the table. In Los Angeles and Long Beach, it was a little slower pace but also serious about sustainability and great products. The farmers markets are like no other and the customer was careful about the origin of their experience.

    MRS: We know that Latin flavors influence your cooking approach and have made their way onto the “Americana” menu at Arcade. Can you tell us a little bit about what that means? Also, what was the biggest take-away from your time in cooking school in Oaxaca?
    CHEF JP: Oaxaca is a very special place. Susana Trilling and her ‘Season’s of my Heart’ cooking school is like no other around. You are taken to this oasis of culture and flavor that can only inspire to immerse yourself into the tradition and passion for true interior Mexican cuisine. Throughout my career, I have taken those techniques and traditions and implemented those flavors on dishes. Taking the traditional methods with a modern twist is what makes ‘Americana’ a thing for us here at Arcade. It’s a fun thing to do.

    MRS: After all this travel, you’ve settled back down into your hometown of San Antonio. What is it about the Alamo city that draws you back?
    CHEF JP: First and foremost is that my family is here in SA. Secondly, it was always a goal of mine whether in this field or another to come back and give back to the community that gave me so much. I was brought up with a ‘scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours’ mentality. I’ve enjoyed paying it forward.

    MRS: Where do you see the San Antonio food scene heading and how do you think it stands out in relation to Austin, Corpus, Dallas and Houston?
    CHEF JP: This is the most exciting time for SA. Never has the dining and beverage scene been so aggressive and innovative. National publications are constantly on the prowl for what SA is doing. That says a lot about where we are and where we are going.

    MRS: What are some of your most prized tools in the back of the house? Any Mission Restaurant Supply favorites?
    CHEF JP: Strainers. Vita Prep. Food Processor. Blue Tape. Black Sharpie.

    Screen shot 2014-09-10 at 1.52.21 PM
    MRS: You’ve landed in a honey hole with your location at the Pearl Brewery, an area you’ve cleverly dubbed “Midtown.” What is the Midtown vibe in your own words and how does that fit the Arcade vision?
    CHEF JP: Location wise it made sense to me to coin Arcade, as a Midtown Kitchen. Midtown in ATL was a hot and urban spot where things were constantly moving forward. I have and continue to see that with SA and Pearl. With the ‘Kitchen’ it was perfect for the approachability on what diners are looking for right now.

    MRS: Which tastemakers, mixologists & foodservice professionals inspire you?
    CHEF JP: Chef Mark Miller will always been a true inspiration to me. Every Chef has a Chef. He’s my Chef. Others that inspire me with their drive and passion, would be Jason Dady, Alice Waters, Nancy Silverton, David Chang, Pano Karatassos, and Dr. Richard Becker. To name a few.

    MRS: Can you share with us your favorite culinary destinations and name some specific memorable meals/libations you’ve had at each of them?
    CHEF JP: Chicago is my favorite R&D spot. I’ve had some of my best meals there. Not necessarily only at the finest dining spots. They really take food seriously and I love traveling up there for inspiration. And their cocktails are top notch!

    MRS: What places are you’re dying to go to still? Any particular dining destinations on your list?
    CHEF JP: Barcelona is on my bucket list. And I would love to add Bangkok, Hong Kong, and South Korea on that list.

    The bar seating at Arcade Midtown Kitchen The bar seating at Arcade Midtown Kitchen

    MRS: The bar program at Arcade is one of the most unique and stimulating facets of your restaurant. What inspired you to incorporate this feature and tell us a little bit about Christopher Ware?
    CHEF JP: The bar program was designed to be a sexy amenity to Arcade. It was built small but it was meant to run big. Implementing an aggressive approach of ‘vintage’ and ‘modern’ cocktails with fine product was the goal. Taking the steps to implement a barrel aged program and hand crafted cocktails to the table diners was still a new thing when we first opened. It’s been exciting to see the growth with our restaurants following the same approach. Everyone wins.

    MRS: Do you have a personal creed or ethos that you live by?
    CHEF JP: (1.) Cooking is the easy part (2.) Adapt or die

    MRS: What was the most difficult part about starting your own restaurant business? What surprised you?
    CHEF JP: Constantly second guessing yourself and wondering if it all will work like you envisioned in your head. You are constantly at the mercy of time tables and product availability. There truly are not enough hours in the day for it and you are never truly ready for it. Buckle up and take the ride.

    MRS: What inspired you to name your first restaurant Arcade Midtown Kitchen?
    CHEF JP: The architecture of the façade of the restaurant was a standout fixture to me. Also the covered dining with rounded brick columns the restaurant houses. In my research, Arcade would constantly come up for ‘columns’ and I immediately was attracted to that name. The name Arcade also stood true for a place where people gather to meet and have a good time. Back in the boardwalk days (aka Boardwalk Empire), Arcades were places to wine and dine with your friends and family. We ran with it and took the more vintage and ‘tongue and cheek’ approach as opposed to the playful ‘video’ game approach.

    MRS: Lay out a perfect meal and wine/cocktail pairing for a first timer to Arcade.
    CHEF JP: Order an Arcade and barrel aged cocktail to share. Calamari and Lobster taco for the table to taste. Any red wine from our wine list that are carefully selected to pair with our cuisine, to enjoy with the Salmon ‘on the rocks’ and ‘Arcade Chile Rubbed Hand Cut Ribeye’ steak with Red Chile Potatoes. A side of Brussel Sprouts. Finishing with Chocolate Pudding Cake and Roasted Banana Stack with Salted Caramel.

    MRS: We recently read that you earned the Introduction Certificate of Sommeliers from the Guild of Master Sommeliers. What an honor. Tell us a little bit about that experience.
    CHEF JP:  I took that test back in 2000, as a hot apps cook when I worked at the former Westin La Cantera Resort. It was an honor to study under Master Sommelier Virginia Phillip. It really sparked my confidence to pair wine with food, especially with Southwestern and Americana flavors. I still have aspirations to take the advanced test in the future.

    MRS: Lastly, what’s up next for Chef Jesse?
    CHEF JP: Great question. Right now, just put my head down and continue to make Arcade a consistently great place for people to enjoy. Then, perhaps a spot or two.


    Thank you Jesse for the great interview! Learn more about Arcade here.

  • 3 Things You May Not Have Known About The Chafing Dish

    When you think of long banquet tables with delicious foods on display or catered parties at your home, what is the one kitchen tool that comes to mind? If your answer was Chafing Dishes, you guessed right.

    Screen shot 2014-09-10 at 5.07.02 PM Image Courtesy of The Oxford Companion To American Food and Drink
    With all the wonderful technology that's infiltrated the world of cooking today, there is still a certain level of appreciation for the unchanging, original design of products that are classic in their nature. Chafing Dishes are one such item and it is their solid simplicity and usefulness that has made it a mainstay in kitchens of all times, shapes and sizes. Interestingly, chafers have a history spanning way, way back. Here are 3 things you may not have known about these kitchen staples.


    1. "Chafer" or "Chafing Dish" comes from the French word "Chauffer" which means "to heat." This soft heat coming from the bottom through a double lining (via the water pan and the food pan) is what makes the chafing dish so desirable for a wide range of foods and delicacies. It lightly cooks, heats and holds food at a heated temperature for a long period of time. Now who wouldn't love that?


    2. Chafing Dishes have been around for a long, long time. How long you ask? Before microwave ovens were in the picture, chafing dishes were used by American colonists in the 1700s. Before that the Europeans used them plentifully, spanning back to the Middle Ages, and before that the inhabitants of ancient Greece and Rome used them on the tables for their lavish feasts and banquets. (Research has shown the remnants of bronze chafing dishes surface in the ruins of Pompei!) From then to now, chafers have had a pretty steady presence, fading out only to come back in. For example, after the Depression and through World War Two, chafing dishes weren't used as widely. However, after the war, chafing dishes had a resurgence as home entertainers began using them more to add something special, slightly more elegant and purposeful to their tables. Today, of course, the chafing dish is a widespread solution to all kinds of commercial and residential needs.

    3. Back in ancient times, chafing dishes were said to be a symbol of the entertainer's prestige and wealth. Different chafers would have different metals, from copper to brass, and delicacies were cooked on display for all the party to see. To this day, you will find chafing dishes of all different styles and materials so that you can find a flattering look for your unique needs and venue.

  • New York New York

    Screen shot 2014-09-08 at 4.16.29 PM
    Since the roaring twenties and the days of Prohibition, the famed 21 Club in New York City has been the dining and imbibing destination of choice for countless movie stars, political figures, business tycoons, and industry leaders. Today it is more than just a restaurant, it is an institution. And though the building is home to many private dining rooms and special nooks and crannies, it is the charismatic Bar Room that has had people talking since the very beginning. Red leather booths snake around a room that features a giant wooden bar (complete with the original hidden chute used to quickly trash liquor bottles during the days of Prohibition). A bartender dressed in a dapper white coat and black bow tie makes the most delicious, ice cold martini we've ever tasted amidst a wall of gleaming spirits and stemware. Scattered around are tables draped in classic red and white checked cloths where countless celebrities have dined before. If you aren't sold already, it takes simply one look skyward to further understand the room's special charm and history. Dangling from every square inch of ceiling space is a blanket of toys and model trucks, airplanes, hard hats, telephones, records, tractors and other industry paraphenalia donated to the club by presidents, business executives and industry tycoons.

    the 21 club nyc

    And this is where we get really excited. As of January 2013, we have had the honor of having our very own Mission Restaurant Supply truck hanging from the 21 Club ceiling over Table #14 in the legendary Bar Room. The room itself is a legacy to businesses around the world that have contributed positively to their markets, and an evening at 21 can be easily spent merely goggling at the amassed assortment of mementos from people's professional success stories. We are very honored to have our little truck here in such a special place and amidst such revered company to represent our Mission culture, and most importantly, to represent our family of employees who make Mission Restaurant Supply what it is. If you're ever in New York City, pop into the 21 Club for a cocktail or a quick lunch in the Bar Room and maze through the signed NFL helmets, sports jerseys, jets, picture frames, cars and more, and eventually you will find our truck over Table #14 (Frank Sinatra's table of choice!)

    So many notable figures have dined in 21's hallowed walls that their website boasts an interactive map where you can find out which tables "belong" to which famous figures. Check it out here.
  • The Dynamic DynaCube

    dynacube
    When it comes to foodservice equipment and supplies, the more your investment can save you time and money, the better. And that's exactly why Dynamic USA has been in the industry since 1964.

    At MissionRS.com you will find the "DynaCube" a professional manual food cutter that is designed to dice up your fruits, vegetables and certain meats in no time. Below are a few graphics to show you the ins and outs plus an informative video so you can watch it in action.


    Screen shot 2014-08-05 at 9.59.10 PM
    What are the Advantages?
    1. The DynaCube will chop up soft, delicate vegetables like tomatoes, onions and peppers with ease in addition to some cooked meats and fruits. It's efficient, rapid, and cuts cleanly to yield the best results in the least amount of time. It can even julienne your vegetables for you!

    2. This product is made of a high quality, durable polycarbonate plastic and is outfitted with a patented grid system made up of two surgical stainless steel blades that are designed to do all the work. There's one grid set available in different sizes that's located within the DynaCube plus one cutter blade mounted externally beneath it. The two blades move in opposite directions and don't ever need to be sharpened.  Simply crank the handle and let the DynaCube's revered, easy blade/grid system do the work for you.

    3. The DynaCube is designed to mount safely and securely to your stainless steel countertops thanks to handy suction cups on the feet of the product. There are also mounts for wood.

    4.Though the DynaCube should not be put in the dishwasher, all parts and pieces can be washed, rinsed, and sanitized in the sink simply.



    The Ins and Outs:
    Screen shot 2014-08-05 at 9.58.06 PM
    DynaCube Anatomy:

    Screen shot 2014-08-05 at 9.57.52 PM


    As you can see, this affordable, manual food cutter is designed to bring efficiency and simplicity to your foodservice business. It's known for its ability to handle those soft fruits and vegetables that often have trouble being cut into fine dices. With the DynaCube those problems are solved. Should you have more questions on the DynaCube or want to learn more about it, please feel free to call one of our customer service agents agents for more information! We're available to visit with you Monday through Friday 8 AM to 6 PM CST.

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